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Daughter Sues to Keep Her Parents Away

Posted by on December 29, 2012 in In The News - Comments Off on Daughter Sues to Keep Her Parents Away
Aubrey Ireland, a snior at University of Cincinnati, obtained a stalking order against her parents.

Aubrey Ireland, a senior at University of Cincinnati, obtained a stalking order against her parents.

Aubrey Ireland, a 21-year-old senior at University of Cincinnati, gets good grades and appears to be successfully pursuing her music and acting career.  She has made Dean’s list every quarter.  Her parents, however, did not see it that way.  David and Julie Ireland often drove 600 miles from Leawood, Kansas, to visit their daughter unannounced.  They accused her of using illegal drugs, promiscuity, and having mental illness.  She insists that none of that is true, and she has repeatedly asked her parents to stop.  The accusations against her only increased. They went to college administrators to try to get their daughter treated for mental illness.  They had monitoring equipment installed on her cell phone and laptop. The harassment got so severe that the university had to hire security guards to keep her parents from attending her performances.  Her parents then stopped paying her tuition, but the university agreed to a full scholarship for her final year at school.  The court has also sided with Aubrey, issuing an order for her parents to stay at least 500 feet away from her until September 2013.  Aubrey told the court, ‘I was a dog with a collar on.”  The judge found that Aubrey is an adult and can live her life as she chooses.  While this is an extreme case, so called “helicopter parents,” who hover over a child’s every move, are increasingly common.  Gary Insch, Joyce Heames, and Nancy McIntyre, researchers at the College of Business and Economics at West Virginia University, note that after driving a child to each planned activity, and then arguing with their teachers over every grade, they continue to meddle as their child reaches adulthood.  A Michigan State University study found that nearly half of parents have directly sought information from their adult child’s employer.

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